VOYAGE OF THE CORAL PRINCESS

An Excerpt

March 31st, 2015

by Kasia Juno

 

When her mother grows ill, Sophie is sent on a northbound cruise with her Aunt Karly. Unlike a traditional comic book heroine, Sophie does not have superhuman powers. She cannot scale buildings or halt bullets mid air, so when she witnesses an attack aboard the ship, she has only her pair of binoculars and her determination to protect her…

 

 

voyage-coralprincess-guts

 

About

This excerpt is taken from early sections of “Voyage of the Coral Princess,” a comic that Kasia put together for a women’s studies course in 2009 and recently refurbished.

Kasia Juno is a writer, teacher, and comic book artist. She studied literature and creative writing at the University of Toronto and at Concordia University in Montreal. Kasia’s work can be found in The Rumpus, Maisonneuve Magazine, The Puritan, and SAND: Berlin’s English Literary Journal. In 2009, she received the Quebec Writer’s Federation short story prize. Kasia is currently at work on a book of short stories.

Find her at kasiajuno.weebly.com

 

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