SUNDAY LINKS

December 6, 2015

from Ned

 

Music critic Caitlin White exposes the lazy misogyny of Vice’s interview series “First Date,” and rightly challenges the assumption that female journalists are at heart “fan girls.” (Also, if you haven’t already read the cringe-worthy, barf-inducing interview with Carly Rae Jepsen referenced in White’s piece, here’s the link.)

A must-read, “White Debt” by Eula Biss reckons “with what is owed—and what can never be repaid—for racial privilege.

A frank look at the ways race impacts wealth disparity among young people: “The gap in gifts, debts, and inheritances creates a vicious cycle with large ramifications for many black Millennials and their financial future—and when combined with redlining and unequal returns on income and education, the odds are stacked in a terrible way.”

This one hurts to read—Anne Theriault’s quietly brilliant meditation on gendered violence.

Julie Lalonde speaks openly about the eleven years of emotional trauma inflicted by an ex-boyfriend. “Let me start: I was a victim of stalking for 11 years. You are not alone.”

An incisive piece on why our conversations about planned parenthood and violence against the organization must incorporate intersectionality. “When we talk about reproductive rights, we are talking about providing access and resources to those most economically and politically marginalized. So an act of domestic terrorism against an organization that provides reproductive health care services to economically disadvantaged communities is absolutely an attack on Black lives.”

From “Bernie Bros” to “Hillary Men,” the feminist-lefty split has reared its ugly head in the Democratic Primaries, serving to derail conversations about the candidates’ actual politics. Or as Amber A’Lee Frost puts it, “The danger here is that in erasing left feminism, consciously or not, progressive media is pitting class against gender—making socialism (or Cold War social democrats, whatever) look sexist to feminists, and making feminism look fucking bourgeois to working people.”

Interview with Stoya on the victim-blaming tactics and anti sex-work rhetoric following her tweet about James Deen.

Harper’s talks with Rachel Notley about Alberta’s tar sands. This is a pretty great quote: “Notley… won the election in a surprise victory last spring. But having good energy policy for your own people while unloosing vast quantities of carbon on the rest of the earth is a bit like being a gun manufacturer who goes to a Quaker meeting.”

Just cuz, here’s a supercut of Tyra announcing the next travel destination on America’s Next Top Model.

90s nostalgia be damned, Valerie Frizzle is a menace who deserves our praise. Gender Focus celebrates real star of The Magic School Bus.

How did we get here so fast? Is it already time for year-end reviews? If it’s gonna happen, Autostraddle’s Top 10 Queer and Feminist Books is not a bad place to start.

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