August 24, 2014

  • The heartbreaking death of fifteen-year-old Tina Fontaine, a member of Sagkeeng First Nation, gives renewed urgency to calls for an inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada. For some insight into the history of Canada’s tragic endemic and what can be done, here are a few resources:
  • “Saying nothing is not an option or a remedy.  I will not be a bystander or silent witness to injustice, murder, discrimination, character assassination, misappropriation, unchecked privilege and what amounts to state sanctioned terrorism of poor black and brown folk.  Silence will not do, but what do you say?” Robyn Boylorn searches for the words to speak about Ferguson in her incredible piece, “Say What?
  • Today is the final day of the People’s Social Forum in Ottawa. If you weren’t able to make it to the event, Rabble has been streaming a number of many events, conversations, workshops, and assemblies, available here. Also check out the first issue of Gaggle, a PSF daily broadsheet, which features Nora Loreto’s manifesto on feminist writers: “Feminist writers must find each other. Support each other. Share each others’ work. Find new ways to collaborate and strengthen old collaborations that we’re involved in.”
  • Let’s talk about feminist film criticism! Toronto’s cléo, a journal of film and feminism, launched its new labour issue this week. The release features a roundtable that touches on both the brilliance and shortcomings of this year’s abortion movie Obvious Child, an interview with radical Indigenous filmmaker, activist, and storyteller, Alanis Obomsawin, and a consideration of queerness and reproduction in Junior. 
  • How California’s first licensed architect, Julia Morgan, gave early twentieth-century women space for leisure.
  • If you are listening to Jenny Lewis’s new album, Voyager, on repeat, you are not alone. Carl Wilson’s piece from earlier this month will only enhance your listening to these rocking feminist jams.




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