OUR SUNDAY LINKS

by GUTS

  • Maya Tokumitsu’s recent Jacobin piece brilliantly acknowledges the links between “Do What You Love” culture, income disparity, and the exploitation of workers, arguing that a “damaging consequence of DWYL is how ruthlessly it works to extract female labor for little or no compensation…Women are supposed to do work because they are natural nurturers and are eager to please; after all they’ve been doing uncompensated childcare, elder care, and housework since time immemorial. And talking money is unladylike anyway.”
  • “It can sometimes appear as though Rob Ford is so stupid and irreverent that he has uniquely managed to slip through the cracks of our legal system, when in fact he possesses the very same privilege that is shared by every other wealthy white male in North America.” Maisonneuve’s Niko Block on the hypocrisy of the Rob Ford saga and domestic abuse in Canada: Rob Ford’s History of Violence.
  • Oscar-nominated director Lexi Alexander Gets Real About How Women are Treated in Hollywood: “There is no lack of female directors. Repeat after me: THERE IS NO LACK OF FEMALE DIRECTORS. But there is a huge lack of people willing to give female directors opportunities. I swear, if anyone near me even so much as whispers the sentence ‘Women probably don’t want to direct,’ my fist will fly as a reflex action.”
  • “We need to stop buying into the myth about gender equality. It isn’t a reality yet. Today, women make up half of the U.S. workforce, but the average working woman earns only 77 percent of what the average working man makes.” This from none other than queen Bey. While it’s unclear whether Beyoncé’s feminism is a marketing ploy to reel back in those “Independent Women,” her recent essay Gender Equality is a Myth! is worth checking out.
  • How has BUST magazine survived?
  • Charlotte Shane’s recent New Inquiry piece, Downward-Facing Drones, is an apt reading of contemporary yoga culture in North America: “For those who are able-bodied and fairly fit, physical exertion as a shortcut to moral enlightenment is an easy sell. As long as you show up for a few ultra-toning hot-yoga sessions several times a week, there’s no need to make any sacrifices or changes to your current lifestyle. You can drive the eight-tenths of a mile to class alone in your SUV, side-eye the women who asks you to move your mat over, and treat yourself to Lululemon afterward without ever surrendering yoga’s holy glo.”
  • Sailor Moon reboot will likely feature LGBT characters 
  • “Feminism: what we need to handle the consequences of being feminist. I learnt very quickly how feminists are assigned the status of difficult people, and how that assignment carries an institutional weight. This is what the figure of the feminist killjoy teaches us.” Sara Ahmed on writing her upcoming book, Living a Feminist Life.

 

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