OUR SUNDAY LINKS

by GUTS

  • “Feminism, According to Stock Photography.” While the categories in this slideshow of stock photography are relatively predictable (girl power, career women, feminism, etc.), the actual images are incredibly bizarre. Our favourite stock-photo trope is “women collapsing on technology.” They are all so sleepy!
  • On Wednesday, the Association of Ontario midwives filed an application with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario over the government’s refusal to comply with pay equity for midwives. “The most recent pay equity reports confirm the pay equity gap for midwives means we are only paid 52% of what our work is worth!”
  • Check out the new issue of cléo journal!
  • Er, what?! “The European manufacturer of an emergency contraceptive pill identical to Plan B, also known as the morning-after pill, will warn women that the drug is completely ineffective for women who weigh more than 176 pounds and begins to lose effectiveness in women who weigh more than 165 pounds.”
  • In celebration of 50 years of Doctor Who, the FWord decided to forgo the “generally accepted Public Feminist Who Stance… [which] is often quite negative,” and focus on the “good.” Did you go see “The Day of the Doctor” in theatre?
  • Published earlier this month in Briarpatch Magazine, part 1 of a round table discussion on the state of organized labour in Canada is worth a read.
  • A new post, “Nationhood is a Verb,” on âpihtawikosisân: “For me, the most important actions we can take to resurge involve rebuilding and strengthening our relationships to the land, and to one another through our languages. Language and land can provide us with the guidance we need to restore all our relationships, to build capacity, to exercise Indigenous nationhood.”
  • Lisa Jutros, wanting to know more about the “women whose bodies [she] borrow[s]” when she watches porn, describes her visit to the set of “Barely Blue Velvet,” a porn spoof of David Lynch’s 1986 film Blue Velvet. From the Maisonneuve article, “In Too Deep”: “’What did you think?’ Jason [the director] asks me later as he drives me back to my hotel. I say it was an odd sex scene to see as my first. What I mean is that the scene’s original premise is that the female character is letting herself get raped because it’s the only way she can save her son; now, it’s been turned into a porn spoof in which the female lead is still clearly not that into it. I don’t tell this to Jason, though.”
  •  “Wal-Mart’s first 50 years were free of Black Friday strikes – indeed, free of any coordinated walkouts in the United States. Then, 14 months ago, a wave of Wal-Mart supply chain strikes that started with crawfish-peeling guest workers and subcontracted warehouse workers spread to include the corporation’s retail employees, first in Southern California and then in cities across the country.”
  • “Where Are All the Female Filmmakers?” Rolling Stones Magazine profiles Gamechanger, a new  production company “whose mission is to fund narrative fiction films made by women.”
  • “Why Is Oral Sex Hard for Hollywood?” The Guardian reflects on actor Evan Rachel Wood’s recent Twitter polemic against the MPAA, the ratings board in the US.

 

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