Our Sunday Links

“The Afrofuturistic Missy Elliott animated short is everything we never knew we needed.” You should probably go watch the fifth instalment of artist Sama’an Ashrawi’s webseries exploring the “ties between creativity, artistry and Afrofuturism.”

An interview with Mykki Blanco explores the inspiration behind the rapper’s latest video for “Hideaway” and his reflections on speaking out in 2015 about being HIV positive.

In a fascinating review of the documentary I Am Not Your Negro, writer Zandria Robinson interrogates the customary ratings applied to the film that level the violence of the civil right’s movement and addresses the elision of women’s voices in the film, particularly that of Lorraine Hansberry’s.

This week Nobel laureate and activist Malala Yousafzai visited Ottawa, receiving honorary Canadian citizenship in a commemorative ceremony, and advocated in the House of Commons for the advancement of education of girls worldwide.

Casey the Canadian Lesbrarian shares six new trans women writers on her treasure-trove of a blog.

“This Week in Garbageville”: an overview of the week’s nightmarish militaristic escalations that have resulted in the U.S. dropping the largest non-nuclear bomb in Afghanistan.

Recent Vimy Ridge commemorations have “included an Indigenous component”; from the prime minister’s office to the CBC, a host of stories featuring the “Indian warriors” of Vimy Ridge or “Indigenous delegations” in France have been discussed. Rabble looks at how this “new trend of praising” Indigenous soldiers serves to conceal or re-write Canadian’s colonialist past.

Vice shares Sarah Oliver Wight’s story of her efforts to undergo genital reassignment surgery after a months-long battle with her insurance company. Sarah’s personal essay is accompanied by poignant and introspective portraits detailing her journey.

Using third-party data, as well as her own survey material, Ashley C. Ford looks at why millennial women are overwhelmingly “tired,” “exhausted,” and “resentful” at the prospect of being the breadwinner in relationships.

Avoiding any spoilers, Buzzfeed reviews the “radical feminist aesthetic” of Hulu’s adaptation of The Handmaid’s Tale. Bitch Media also features a great article that looks specifically at the anti-blackness within Margaret Atwood’s work.

“Happy Easter! Here Comes the Witches!”

Home Simpson chasing cholcate

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