Our Sunday Links

Christening this week and opening Black History Month with a blessing for the ages, Beyoncé announced that she is pregnant with twins. For commentary on the announcement, I highly suggest you listen to Kid Fury and Crissle on The Read before consulting any other sources. In other great news, Syd released a solo album called Fin and it is sexy and beautiful and I highly recommend you honour your ears and your whole being by listening to it in a dimly lit room with sensual accents like silk, cashmere, or a candle. (You could also read Ruth Saxelby on how Syd makes room for pleasure in politics).  

Marley Dias, literacy advocate and creator of #1000BlackGirlBooks, is publishing a book with Scholastic which is set to come out in 2018.  

Rahawa Haile writes beautifully about hiking the Appalachian Trail as a Black woman and how Black authors made it possible.

For your Black History Month reading list, here are four Canadian Black queer authors you should be reading. And just a note that these authors, especially if you add sci-fi author Nalo Hopkinson to your reading list, fuck with all conceptions of linear temporality.

If you don’t know about the history on Black life on the prairies, this short video about Amber Valley, one of the first all-Black settlements in Canada, is a great place to start.

A collection of twenty literary voices on resistance and what’s next in the current political era.

Now is a time for poetry: Edwidge Danticat on poetry and protest.  

Read the stories of eight women, most of whom are Muslim, in the U.S. who are directly affected by the ban.

Twenty things non-Muslim people can do to counter Islamophobia.

For people in Canada mobilizing against the U.S. immigration policy  

Borders: they’re created through racialization, economics, and settler occupation. Fariha Róisín on what borders mean right now, thinking beyond mapped geographies.

Trudeau is abandoning his commitment to reforming the federal electoral system.  

Cicely-Belle Blain breaks down the ways queer spaces and parties alienate Black queer people.

Your fave podcast (and mine) has released a new series on their blog called Go Ask your Auntie(s), an anti-colonial advice column by Auntie Climax and Auntie Social.

Raven Davis thinks on their mother, art, and Anishinaabe pedagogy.

Jen Agg, feminist restaurant owner, is asking for help in calling the restaurant industry on its misogyny.

Sara Ahmed proposes a feminist smile strike, “to announce our disagreement, our unhappiness, with a system.”

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