Our Sunday Links

Happy Black history month and welcome to the Sunday Links!

First, a working list of Black women writers, editors, and journalists in Canadaread their work and pay them.

A love letter to Black women

Hannah Black’s review of We Were Eight Years in Power by Ta-Nehisi Coates.

28 Days, 28 Films for Black History Month!

Black prairie histories are often absented. Bashir Mohamed’s work surfacing these deep histories is so important and definitely worth a read.

More ways to read, learn, and access Black canadian history.

Have a look at this map that marks land and food sovereignty projects lead by Black, Indigenous, and people of colour. Reparations for Black, Indigenous, Latinx,  and Farmers of colour!

Do yourself a favour and read this interview with Morgan Parker, and while you’re at it you should probably also read this interview with Hilton Als.

 

Gerald Stanley is currently on trial for the murder of Colten Boushie, a young nêhiyaw man. While the defense issued a statement before jury selection saying that this trial is not about race, all visibly Indigenous people were barred from the jury, which seems to clearly indicate that this is very much about race. As Andray Domise writes: “whatever the outcome, two injustices have already happened. Colten Boushie died in a social environment that has worked for centuries to reduce the lives and bodies of Indigenous people to the mercy of the white imagination. And the man who is accused of killing him will be tried after a jury-selection process that the greatest legal minds of our generation … have damned as unjust.”

Doug Cuthand explains how the trial violates Cree cultural norms around grief and death.

 

Help guarantee access to menstrual products for people in Northern Saskatchewan for those who need them by donating to Moon Time Sisters.

Anthony Oliveira thinks about death in the village, and the ways queer men aren’t protected by authorities.

It has been a year since the Quebec massacre, what’s changed?

In film disability often signifies villainy or is marked as something to be fixed, and that’s a problem.

A literary prize for thrillers without gendered violence!

FYI:

How might virtual reality help us think about abortion?

This isn’t exactly feminist news, but my little sister would like everyone to sign this petition asking the Minister of Fisheries and the Minister of Environment and Climate Change to issue an emergency order under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) to protect the Southern Resident killer whales.

When travel safety really means cis het white women’s safety, people of colour—and in particular Black women—have to create their own resources.


My fave punk crush Laura Jane Grace teaches readers of O Magazine how to honour people with those two, three, or four letter words we call pronouns.

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Our Sunday Links

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