Our Sunday Links

I recently moved and instead of buying curtains for my new place, I got a jewel tone silk robe. I figure it serves more or less the same purpose as curtains, which is to limit one’s neighbours’ sightings of one’s nude self. Honestly, I think it’s working. What is a robe but a curtain for the body? Put another way, I hope you get to spend this Sunday lounging around, out of sight, in a robe.

 

The Tsilhqot’in Nation is busy protecting their territories from both forest fires and pipelines (at the same time).  

Get ready for Robyn Maynard’s forthcoming book Policing Black Lives, where she examines Black resistance to and anti-blackness within the context of Canadian multiculturalism and colonialism.

Rinaldo Walcott writes on his and other Black scholars and thinkers’ opposition to Toronto City Council’s proposed “Intersectionality Awareness Week.” He explains that the themed week “reduced intersectionality to an amalgamation of differences residing in one body, a kind of individual multiculturalism. It missed the now broader and more nuanced understanding of the term – not to mention the Black feminist and labour movements that inspired it.”

The Black Experience Project surveys Black people in the Greater Toronto Area about their daily experiences.

Mi’kmaq elders held ceremony to remove the spirit and violent legacy of Edward Cornwallis in K’jipuktuk. Demands have been made to city officials to remove the statue of Cornwallis, but they have yet to follow through. Former Halifax poet laureate El Jones was doxxed following her activism and support of the removal the Cornwallis statue.

Halifax celebrated Pride on Saturday, and Justin Trudeau was there. Queer organizers in Halifax describe how the prime minister’s presence at the parade continues in the tradition of marginalizing the voices of Black, Indigenous, and Muslim queer and trans people.

Fifteen Latina teens held a Quinceañera on the steps of the Texas State Capitol in protest of a anti-immigration bill. One of the protestors explained, “Quinceañera is an important tradition to bring families together, to unite communities, to unite culture. Today, we do that to protest SB4.”

How Peppermint learned to camp.

A brief history of Queercore!

Check out these tracks, all produced by women and non-binary people, from the Sister collective.

If you haven’t read our interview with Vivek Shraya, I recommend you re-listen to her newest album Part-Time Woman and then read the interview! Shraya also talked with Kai Cheng Thom and you can read that conversation here.

Half-pipe, a short story by Zoe Whittall. It’s a very good read about being a teen girl in the world and does deal with rape, FYI.
Thinking on R. Kelly, Ashley C. Ford wonders what it would look like for her community to support Black women and girls as fiercely as they do Black men and boys.

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Our Sunday Links

A weekly roundup of links from GUTS

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