A GRAPHIC ESSAY

November 3, 2015
by Frankie Noone 

 

LarissaDiakiw_Conversations-in-the-Dark

 

ABOUT

Larissa Diakiw is a writer based out of Toronto. She creates comics and graphic essays as Frankie Noone.

RESOURCES

As Métis activist and scholar Chelsea Vowel wrote after the Truth and Reconciliation Commission released its findings in June 2015, it is critically important for all people living in Canada to read at least the summary of the report. You can read all of the TRC’s findings—including the executive summary, principles, testimonies, and calls to action—here. Other resources that will help readers access this material include a crowd-sourced YouTube series that features activists, artists, scholars, and community members reading from the executive summary; Kindle-format and epub files of the executive summary; and a digital archive of residential school testimonies.

 

“Conversations in the Dark” is from our FOOD/LAND Issue (fall 2015)

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