July 15, 2016


Do you believe in a thing called LOVE?

For our fall issue, GUTS is looking for essays, interviews, comics, journalism, poetry, short fiction, and humour that explore the concept of love as it figures in culture, politics, and our personal lives.

We are interested in love’s uses, transgressions, shapes, failings, and potentials.

What can or can’t love do? What have you done for it, with it, without it, or against it?

Fortifying or exhausting, reconciling or divisive, pleasure or pain, political or inert, we want to know what you think about love.

Topics to think about:
Decolonial love, queer love, love as community, critiques of love, being single, the couple form, dating, non-monogamy, marriage as colonial tool, domestic violence and love, violence in the name of love, widows, self love, self care, heart clicks, online affective displays, emotional labour, work as love, love as resistance, kinship and relationality, non-eurocentric conceptualizations of queerness, the “love song,” romance, aromanticism, nostalgia (love looking backwards), things we love to hate, etc.!


Submit a short pitch (max 300 words) describing your proposed project no later than August 8, 2016 to We are happy to consider quickly written and casual proposals, but please include a link to or copy of a writing sample that you feel adequately represents your work.

GUTS also encourages the submission of visual content relevant to our theme. Please look over our past issues to get a sense of the kind of work we’re looking for.

Final submissions (500-4,000 words) will be due on September 23, 2016.

Compensation will be provided for contributors selected for the issue.

If you have any questions or comments about the submission process, please email us at


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