Our Sunday Links

Under the guidance of my dad, I got myself a pumice stone this week. Then I told him about his moon sign (which is in sagittarius in case you were wondering). I hope you and the people you love surprise you in good ways this week. Without further ado, the links!

The Knowles sisters have blessed us once again, this time in writing; if you haven’t already, you must read Beyoncé interviewing Solange.

Listen to one exclusive hundred songs by your fave artists and protect a few of the organizations under threat by the new US presidential administration at the same time with Our First 100 Days.

GUTS-crush Lena Waithe has written and produced an upcoming show we’re excited to watch called THE CHI.

Black Girls Magazine is a magazine created for and by Black girls! And they’re based in the Greater Toronto Area.

Hit up your local library and check out some books by these six Canadian trans women writers and these 11 Indigenous authors

Dylann Roof, the man who shot and killed nine people in Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, was sentenced to death this week. On his sentence, Bim Adewunmi writes: “To kill Dylann Roof is to erase him utterly, and the social contract demands that we commit to it fully. Because if he is gone, we can pretend that his crime was a freak alchemical accident, not a horrific but logical end point for a narrative that has been in evidence for hundreds of years, and is now enabled and strengthened by a number of factors in the modern era. What also gets erased is culpability — how institutions and society at large maintain the kind of status quo that fuels the hate Dylann Roof had been carrying for so much of his young life, for example — as well as the chance to engage, and to bring about a real reckoning.”

An intimate interview with Vivek Shraya on race, queerness, and her art practice.

Lindsay Nixon has been appointed as Canadian Art’s Indigenous editor-at-large! You can read their thoughts on the appointment here.

Terese Marie Mailhot writes to non-Native people, prompted by Konrad Yakabuski’s recent piece, asking us to take a seat and listen before we speak or write on Indigenous identity.

Charges against Vanessa Gray, Stone Stewart, and Sarah Scanlon—the land protectors who shut down Line 9have been dropped under the condition they do not disturb Enbridge for 18 months.

Paul Seesequasis has a book coming out in 2018. Until then you can keep up with the beautiful archival photos of Indigenous people he posts on his twitter.

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