Our Sunday Links

Welcome back to the Sunday Links following our brief winter hiatus!

 

On Liking Women by Andrea Long Chu is the best thing I’ve read all week. Chu takes a deep dive into feminist histories—shoring up politics of lesbianism, desire, and exclusion—and reveals a more complicated topography than the one I’ve often been told about so-called 2nd wave feminism. Go for the historiography, stay for alluring combination of witty prose and smooth theory.

Get your reading list ready: thirty highly anticipated nonfiction reads and queer books (and other media too!) for 2018.

Don’t miss Alicia Elliott’s memo to Canada!

Jordan McDonald writes about the ways queerness for Black women on TV, in characters like Nola Darling, Annalise Keating, and Nova Bordelon, “corroborate[s] deep-seated fears about Black women’s sexual agency.”

Reproductive Justice means thinking about maternal mortality.

Serena Williams and Black excellence, joy, and motherhood.

Ontario is raising minimum wage! And according to a recent study, increasing minimum wage creates more jobs than it kills.

Lynn Beyak is racist and has been removed from the Conservative caucus of the senate.

If you’re interested in how Silicon Valley thinks of itself and the politics and culture of tech, check out this interview with Fred Turner.

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Our Sunday Links

A weekly roundup of links from GUTS

When Ceremony is Not Enough

On the promise of healing through culture

Our Sunday Links

A weekly roundup of links from GUTS

Ask a Feelings-Witch: Organizing Burnout

Advice on organizing, obligation, and knowing when and how to call it quits from Carly Boyce, Feelings Witch.

Our Sunday Links

A weekly roundup of links from GUTS

Ontario Midwives Demand Pay Equity

The Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario ruled in favour of midwives's demands for equitable pay

Our Sunday Links

A weekly roundup of feminist links from GUTS

Laughing in the Dark: Watching Melanated Films with White People

Films for and about Black people and people of colour are worthy of celebration. The experience of watching these films as a person of colour, however, depends on who else is in the theatre.