IN THE BUSH ZINE

 

This zine was put together over a series of discussion nights, collage hangouts, and online conversations between “Bushwhackers” and our mothers.  Unless otherwise stated, the images in this zine are collaged and we don’t own them.  We were encouraged toward this topic by GUTS magazine.  We were interested in how our mothers relate themselves to feminism, the digital and physical archives of our relationships with our mothers (Facebook chats, paintings, etc.), and the things we can only say about our mothers anonymously.

view the zine

Selection from Into the Bush Zine

portrait2

ABOUT

In the Bush is a creative feminist collective that embodies the spirit of the bush—free, untamed, flowing, a little gross, and up for interpretation. Our aim is to destabilize socially sanctioned categories relating to gender and sexuality. In the Bush facilitates bi-weekly discussions in Vancouver, BC to which all are welcome. Get involved, give feedback, or check out In The Bush Zine Issue 1: The Sex Files at: www.inthebushzine.tumblr.com.

This zine is also available for sale! Get in touch with In The Bush for copies.

 

“In the Bush Zine” is from our MOMS Issue (spring 2015)

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