Our Sunday Links

If you’re planning on watching the Oscars tonight, you might want to prepare by reading these letters to Mahershala Ali, three feminist film critics’ thoughts on Isabelle Huppert’s performance in Elle, and by listening to Jenna Wortham and Wesley Morris prepare you for disappointment on Still Processing.

Oh, and regardless of whether or not you care about the Oscars you should probably read (and swoon over) Mahershala Ali’s interview in GQ on his Oscar picks. Also! Omg, Mahershala and his wife Amatus just had a baby!

In other film news, Frederick McKindra watches Get Out and asks what it means for a Black man to be sacred in suburbia, within the history of horror movies and the context of real-life violence perpetrated against Black men in the suburbs.

If you’re a trans student in the U.S. experiencing anti-trans violence at school, you can reach out to Lambda Legal for legal support. If you’re not trans and you’ve got cash to spare, consider donating to Trans Lifeline.

Janet Mock writes about her experience as a trans teen in high school.

(Trans) Love and Other Scars is a combination review-interview with Torrey Peters, author of newly published Infect Your Friends and Loved Ones, and Kai Cheng Thom. If you love this interview, check out the unedited version.

Roxane Gay is a brilliant best-selling author, and you can read her about the development of her career as an author alongside nice comments from her friends here.

Oprah Winfrey will star as Deborah Lacks, Henrietta’s daughter, in the film adaptation of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.

An interview with Angela Peoples, the Black woman in the most iconic picture from the women’s march, on the story behind the picture, her decision to attend the march in the first place, how white women need to show up, and how Black women show up for each other.

Thinking on spatialization and surveillance, Yaniya Lee interviews Kapwani Kiwanga about A wall is just a wall, an exhibition on at The Power Plant in Toronto.

Check out this Tea & Bannock interview with Chief Lady Bird about her art practice, inspirations, and dreams.

If you don’t already, you should know about Mary Two-Axe Earley and her battle against the racist, sexist, and colonial legislation of the Indian Act.

Ren Hang died this week and will be remembered through his beautiful and provocative photography.

Ren Hang, http://renhang.org/#
Ren Hang, renhang.org

A piece on the misuse of witch hunt, as used by Margaret Atwood and other rape apologists to describe the Can-lit scene.

It’s real: masturbation at the intersection of anxiety, depression, and sleeplessness.

Homelessness is criminalized; here are a few examples of the municipal bylaws that criminalize homelessness and ways that people resist them.

A long-form piece on the fall of Milo Yiannopoulos.

The Women’s Day strike is coming up, and the conversations around it are complicated and contradictory. Responding to Sady Doyle’s call for more imaginative forms of resistance, Magally A. Miranda Alcazar and Kate D. Griffiths write in defense of the striking across class and race boundaries.

That’s all for now. I hope this week is a good one, xoxoxo.

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Our Sunday Links

A weekly round up of links from GUTS

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Our Sunday Links

A weekly roundup of links from GUTS

Our Sunday Links

A weekly roundup of links from GUTS

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Our Sunday Links

A weekly roundup of links from GUTS

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